HOW TO HELP CHILDREN EXPRESS THEIR FEELINGS

The theme of this year’s Children’s Mental Health Week is Express Yourself

Expressing yourself is about finding ways to share feelings, thoughts, or ideas, through creativity. This could be through art, music, writing and poetry, dance and drama, photography and film, and doing activities that make you feel good.

Be in the moment

When a child is distressed, acknowledge their experiences and feelings in the moment.

 “I can see you’re sad” , “It’s OK to cry”

Help them put their feelings into words

For children who are developing language, help them to put their feelings into words by linking their facial expressions and body language to a word. This will help them describe their feelings and understand those feelings in themselves.

“You’re smiling – you must be happy!”

Use open-ended questions

When talking to children, ask open-ended questions using the 5 W’s and 1 H, Who, What,  When, Where Why, How.

This helps children learn to acknowledge and articulate their feelings, and opens opportunities to interact more in a conversation, and helps children develop coping and problem-solving skills

Use role play

Encouraging role play helps children to act out their emotions in a safe environment. Parents can also ask the child to act out specific emotions, this will help the child to develop their own understanding of emotions, and help parents to understand what that emotion looks like and means to the child.

Practice Mindfullness

Incorporate mindfulness, breathing activities or other relaxation techniques into everyday routines and activities in educational settings.

WHY JOIN THE PMA KIDS COMMUNITY

By strengthening the mental health of children, whilst also supporting the other not less important, but well-known areas such as safety, security, financial support and academia, we support the whole child both mentally and physically.

With our resources for parents and children, PMA Kids ltd aims to develop key strengths from early childhood by bridging the gap between years of positive psychology and child development study and the mainstream public.

References

Beyond Blue Ltd. (2017). Building resilience in children aged 0–12: A practice guide

Teaching Children to name their feelings. Adams, Emily J.YC Young Children; Washington Vol. 66, Iss. 3,  (May 2011): 66-67.

Disclaimer

All information posted is merely for educational and informational purposes. It is not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Should you decide to act upon any information on this website, you do so at your own risk.